Elisha May Rubacha | too much nothing

ISBN 978-1-926889-29-0

5.5×8.5, 28pp, /80, $10.00

Purchase book here.

Elisha May Rubacha’s too much nothing is a book of poems about exploration and measurement. Prompted by the career of Roberta Bondar, the poet oscillates between childhood and the present to consider movement in time and space. Rubacha questions how we orient ourselves on scales small and large, and examines the things “we understand / against those we only imagine.”

Poetry (June 2018)

Media:

2 August 2019: Michael Dennis, Today’s Book of Poetry: “Today’s book of poetry has nothing but praise for Elisha May Rubacha’s Too Much Nothing.  Strength, beauty and intelligence in one tiny chapbook, Rubacha has wit and charm and her poetry shows it.”

1 August 2019: Jeremy Luke Hill, The Town Crier: “In any given poem, these themes might only operate in a narrow register, but collectively they form a complex and satisfying intervention into the questions they interrogate. They become layers that Rubacha forms, one atop the other, in order to create a volume that is more complex and nuanced than any of its constituent parts.”

January 2019: Scott Cecchin, Bywords: ”   Like all proper poetry, Rubacha’s book demands that we speak the world truthfully. And she does this well. Her poems ask us what is possible for girls and women here on earth, and how we might reimagine those lives; she muses over technology, and its ability to either enhance or limit our thoughts; and finally, she asks us to assert our stories in the face of “too much nothing” – those forces in our lives which seek to erase what is true and what is possible, whether it be men, mosquitoes, or black holes.”

30 June, 2018: rob mclennan: “I’m impressed by the amount of activity Rubacha manages to contain within these small, deceptively straightforward poems, writing short observational musings on space, childhood and Roberta Bondar, and her poems close well before they end, leaving the rest of each piece to sit in the thoughts of the reader for some time after. These are poems that might be small in size, but contain multitudes, composed as quiet, thoughtful pieces I would like to see more of. I am hoping there might be more.”

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